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Casio PX-330 digital piano review


The Casio PX-330 digital piano is a big step up from the Casio PX-150: the 8W x 8W internal speakers and 250 tones allow for good sound reproduction whatever the environment whilst the tri-sensor hammer action (where 3 electrical signals are emitted as each key is depressed) allows for responsive playing. It’s a great value instrument and excellent for the gigging musician.

Online retailers

Retailer Country Price from
gear4musiclogo usroundflag £589.00
musicroomlogo usroundflag £629.00
musiciansfriendlogo  usroundflag n/a

About Casio digital pianos

Casio digital pianos have historically catered for the lower-cost end of the market, bridging the gap between the keyboards that they’re famous for and digital pianos.  Casio make a lot of their own components and hence costs have historically been lower than competitors.  At the time of writing, their range currently comprises a few entry level digital pianos (CDP range), the Privia range (of which the Casio PX-330 is one) and the Celviano range but nothing more expensive than £1,100.  Casio products are best-suited for beginners and those on a particularly tight budget although more recent products have been raved about by more experienced and internationally famous musicians.  For more information about Casio digital pianos, please click here: http://www.casio.co.uk/products/musical-instruments/

About Casio Privia range

Casio describe their PX range as “small and compact, yet stylish and feature-packed, for today’s lifestyle”.  The range comprises products that are generally between £450-£850 in price and they are generally considered good value for money and products that don’t take up much space.  However, whilst they are neatly packaged, it is agreed by many that they lack the tone and touch quality versus their Yamaha rivals (although this is being addressed in new releases).

Tone

The Casio PX-330 is a big step up from the PX 150 and is an upgrade to the earlier PX-320.  The tonal quality is the most noticeable difference in quality versus more junior models: although not huge, the 8W x 8W speakers instantly make a difference and the increased layering on the sound make a direct comparison quite obvious on the ears.  There are 250 tones (instruments) and through an amp the intensity sounds even better.

Touch

The Casio PX-330, like the majority of the Privia range, is a medium-weighted piano – the most cost-efficient option but behind a fully-weighted or heavy-weighted digital piano in terms of real piano likeness.  The new “tri-sensor scaled hammer action” (three touch sensors on each note versus two previously) on the Casio PX-330 upgrades the responsiveness you get whilst playing.

Value for Money

three and a half star

Colours

The Casio PX-330 is currently available only in Black.

Casio PX 330

Further information

People who tend to buy pianos like the Casio PX-330 are usually more experienced pianists who gig and don’t have a great deal of space to put a larger instrument.  The instrument has now been superseded by the PX 350 but it still collects rave reviews: “Use it as the main axe on a world tour.  Score a low-budget film with it.  Take it on a cruise ship.  Record a hit single on it that you’ll hear on iTunes.  Play it in piano bars in New York, Rio, London and Mumbai” says one review!  One really picky comment mentioned that whilst the LCD screen improved the instrument versus earlier models, it was still pretty dim in low-light conditions.

Other pianos for consideration

Those who are considering purchasing the Casio PX-330 might also consider the Casio PX-3, Casio PX-350 and the Kurzweil SP4-7.

Technical specification

Full technical specifications can be found here: http://www.casio.co.uk/products/musical-instruments/privia-digital-pianos/Product/PX-330BKC5/

Links

Keyboard Mag have done a great review of the Casio PX-330: http://www.keyboardmag.com/article/casio-privia-px-330-the-digital-piano-for-everyone/1721

Here’s Andrei Quint introducing the Privia n30 range (to which the Casio PX-330 belongs):

*in order to pay for the upkeep of the site, please note that there are affiliate links used on this page

1 comment

  1. JennyJ says:

    We use our Casio PX 330 for church choir practice: it has a big enough sound and perfect for the high-ceiling room we have it in. Shop around though (we got ours on Amazon in the end) as with the newer models being released there are deals to be had.

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