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Casio PX-135 digital piano review


The Casio PX-135 digital piano is the entry level in the Casio Privia range and the Casio PX 135 is arguably just a more powerfully amplified version of some of the CDP range. With 18 sounds, 128-note polyphony (allowing chordal passages to be handled well) and 2 decent little speakers, it’s the perfect digital piano for the beginner to practice on.

Price at online retailers

Retailer Country Price from
gear4musiclogo usroundflag £399.00
musicroomlogo usroundflag n/a
musiciansfriendlogo  usroundflag n/a

About Casio digital pianos

Casio digital pianos have historically catered for the lower-cost end of the market, bridging the gap between the keyboards that they’re famous for and digital pianos.  Casio make a lot of their own components and hence costs have historically been lower than competitors.  At the time of writing, their range currently comprises a few entry level digital pianos (CDP range), the Privia range (of which the Casio PX-135 is one) and the Celviano range but nothing more expensive than £1,100.  Casio products are best-suited for beginners and those on a particularly tight budget.  For more information about Casio digital pianos, please click here: http://www.casio.co.uk/products/musical-instruments/

About Casio CDP range

Casio describe their PX range as “small and compact, yet stylish and feature-packed, for today’s lifestyle”.  The range comprises products that are generally between £450-£850 in price and they are generally considered good value for money and products that don’t take up much space.  However, whilst they are neatly packaged, it is agreed by many that they lack the tone and touch quality versus their Yamaha rivals (although this is being addressed in new releases).

Tone

two and a half stars

The Casio PX-135 is the replacement model for the earlier PX 130 and the tonal quality of the instrument is also improved.  Whilst some argue that there is no discernable difference in sound quality to the CDP range (particularly the CDP 220R), the Casio PX-135 features 128 note polyphony meaning that when multiple sounds are layered together, the sound quality is not lost.  There are 18 available sounds and all can have their brilliance (brightness/dullness) adjusted to taste.  The speakers (2 x 8W) are adequate but the piano would need amplification if you’re looking to play in a larger room or one where lots of people congregate.

Touch

two and a half stars

The Casio PX-135 is a medium-weighted piano – the most cost-efficient option but behind a fully-weighted or heavy-weighted digital piano in terms of real piano likeness.  Whilst many users report great satisfaction with the way the Casio PX-135 plays, there are some that report a clicking or clacking sound as the keys are pressed although this has reportedly been improved versus the earlier PX 130.

Value for Money

Colours

The Casio PX-135 is currently only available in Black.

Casio PX 135

Further information

People who tend to buy pianos like the Casio PX-135 are usually beginners or those who don’t have a great deal of space to put a larger instrument.  It’s a widely recommended instrument in the digital piano fraternity although for more experienced pianists, there are definitely more advanced models that will be more suitable.

Other pianos for consideration

Those who are considering purchasing the Casio PX-135 might also consider the Casio CDP 120 or Casio CDP 220R, the Yamaha P95 or the Korg SP170.

Technical specification

Full technical specifications can be found here: http://www.casio.co.uk/products/musical-instruments/privia-digital-pianos//Product/PX-135BKC5/

Links

The MusicPlayer site offers further information regarding the Casio PX-135http://forums.musicplayer.com/threads.php/topics/2369683/1

Here’s an Italian chap demonstrating the Casio PX-135:

*in order to pay for the upkeep of the site, please note that there are affiliate links used on this page

1 comment

  1. Howard James says:

    We packed our son off to university with one of these: we tried out various digital pianos but in the end we went for the Casio PX 135 as with a Casio you seem to get a lot more for your money. Given what we paid for it, it has more than acceptable sound quality and a decent touch and Gordon (our son) can plug it through an amp if needed.

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